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Neighborite

Named for Frank Neighbor who was a district geologist with the Sun Oil Company in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA and who helped provide the first samples for study. Neighborite is an uncommon mineral that occurs at its Utah, USA locality as authigenically formed under aluminum poor conditions in dolomite-rich oil shales, at its Russian locality in the Ural Mountains in a metamorphosed tuff and clay carbonate sediments, at its Norwegian locality near Lake Gjerdigen in crystal lined cavities in alkaline granites, and at its Canadian locality in pegmatite cavities and in hornfels within the Mont Saint-Hilaire complex.

Ref. Handbook of Mineralogy, Anthony et al (1995) and MSA at http://www.handbookofmineralogy.org/pdfs/neighborite.pdf

Nekoite

An anagram for the mineral it was originally mistaken as, Nekoite is a reverse spelling of the mineral okenite. Nekoite is a rare mineral that can be found in the United States, Brazil, and Uzbekistan among just a couple others. At one of its US localities in California, Nekoite occurs in a limestone deposit that was subject to contact metamorphism.

Ref. Handbook of Mineralogy, Anthony et al (1995) and MSA at http://www.handbookofmineralogy.org/pdfs/nekoite.pdf

Nenadkevichite

Named in honor of Konstantin Avtonomovich Nenadkevich who was a Russian mineralogist and geochemist for the A.E. Fersman Mineralogical Museum in Moscow, Russia. Nenadkevichite is a rare mineral that occurs “between crystals of microcline in a nartolite-albite-rich pegmatite in nepheline syenite in a differentiated alkalic massif” at its Russian locality in the Lovozero massif, and “in pegmatites, cavities in igneous breccias, hornfels, and marble xenoliths in an intrusive alkalic gabbro-syenite complex at the Mont Saint-Hilaire locality in Canada. Other localities include Greenland and newer localities in China, the United States, and Namibia.

Ref. Handbook of Mineralogy, Anthony et al (1995) and MSA at http://www.handbookofmineralogy.org/pdfs/nenadkevichite.pdf

Neptunite

Named after the Roman mythological god of the sea, Neptune due to its association at the type locality with aegerine which derived its name from Ægir, who was the Scandinavian mythological god of the sea. Neptunite is found in localities in Greenland, Russia, Mongolia, Tajikistan, Ireland, Canada, the USA, and Australia among only a couple others. At one if its United States localities in California, Neptunite occurs “in natrolite veins cutting a glaucophane schist inclusion in a serpentinite body.” Neptunite is piezoelectric and will generate a charge in response to pressure.

Ref. Handbook of Mineralogy, Anthony et al (1995) and MSA at http://www.handbookofmineralogy.org/pdfs/neptunite.pdf

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