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Johachidolite

Named for the type locality in the Johachide sidtrict in the Kankyo Hodu Prefecture of North Korea. Johachidoite is a rare mineral that can be found only at its type locality and is also attributed to the Mogok region of Myanmar. Jodachidolite occurs at its type locality in a nepheline dike that cuts limestone. It has a blue fluorescence under short-wave ultraviolet light and is also weakly phosphorescent.

Ref. Handbook of Mineralogy, Anthony et al (1995) and MSA at http://www.handbookofmineralogy.org/pdfs/johachidolite.pdf

Johannite

Named to honor Austrian Archduke Johann Baptist Josef Fabian Sebastian, the founder of the Landesmuseum in Graz, Austria. Johannite is an uncommon mineral that forms in oxidized, sulfide-bearing uraninite deposits, and usually forms post-mine. It can be found in localities in the Czech Republic, Germany, England, France, Tajikistan, Gabon, the United States, and Canada, among a couple others. Johannite is strongly radioactive. It will decompose in water and leaves a bitter or sour taste.

Ref. Handbook of Mineralogy, Anthony et al (1995) and MSA at http://www.handbookofmineralogy.org/pdfs/johannite.pdf

Johannsenite

Johannsenite

Named for Professor Albert Johannsen, a petrologist at the University of Chicago in Illinois, USA. Johannsenite is an uncommon mineral that occurs in Mexico, the United States, Italy, Japan, and a number of other localities. It occurs in quartz or calcite veins that cut through rhyolite, as well as in manganese-bearing skarn and metasomatized limestone.

Ref. Handbook of Mineralogy, Anthony et al (1995) and MSA at http://www.handbookofmineralogy.org/pdfs/johannsenite.pdf

Johnwalkite

Named in honor of Richard Johnson (john) and Frank Walkup (walk), who were mineral preparers at the National Museum of Natural History in Washington D.C., USA. Johnwalkite is a rare mineral that can be found only here in the Black Hills of South Dakota in the Expectation pegmatite at the Champion mine, near Keystone. It is “a rare secondary mineral derived from the dissolution of triphyllite-lithiophilite and columbite-tantalite in a complex granite pegmatite.

Ref. Handbook of Mineralogy, Anthony et al (1995) and MSA at http://www.handbookofmineralogy.org/pdfs/johnwalkite.pdf

Jonesite

Named after Francis Tucker Jones, a Research Chemical Microscopist of California, USA who was the discoverer of the mineral. Jonesite is a rare mineral that can be found in the United States at its type locality in the Dallas Gem mine in California, in Slovakia at Vechec, and in the Atlantic Ocean along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Jonesite is found in fractures and cavities of breccaited greenstone within blueschist. Jonesite fluoresces a dull orange under shot=wave ultraviolet light.

Ref. Handbook of Mineralogy, Anthony et al (1995) and MSA at http://www.handbookofmineralogy.org/pdfs/jonesite.pdf

Jordanite

Named for Dr. H. Jordan from Saarbrucken, Germany, who was the first to provide the original material for study.  Jordanite is an uncommon by widespread mineral that occurs in lead-arsenic occurrences hosted in metamorphosed dolostone, in low-temperature epithermal veins and epithermal gold-quartz veind, and from ocean floor black smoker chimneys. Localities for Jordanite include Switzerland, Poland, Germany, the Czech Republic, Italy, Greece, Sweden, Norway, England, Japan, the United States, and in the Pacific Ocean along the East Pacific Rise.

Ref. Handbook of Mineralogy, Anthony et al (1995) and MSA at http://www.handbookofmineralogy.org/pdfs/jordanite.pdf

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