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Kamotoite-(Y)

Named after the town of Kamoto, and the Kamoto mine in the Democratic Republic of the Congo where the mineral gets its type locality. Kamotoite is a rare mineral that forms in oxidized uranium-bearing copper-cobalt deposits. It can be found in additional localities in Switzerland, Norway, Germany, the Czech Republic, and Canada. Kamotoite is radioactive.

Ref. Handbook of Mineralogy, Anthony et al (1995) and MSA at http://www.handbookofmineralogy.org/pdfs/kamotoite-(Y).pdf

Kampfite

Named for Dr. Robert Anthony Kampf of the Los Angeles County museum of Natural History in California, USA, for his contributions to the study of minerals. Found only at the Esquire No.1, the type locality, and Esquire No.7 claims near Big Creek-Rush Creek in California, USA. It occurs there as a rock forming mineral in a quartz-sanbornite gneiss where it forms as light blue-gray, irregular, cleavable masses.

Ref. Minerals and their Localities, Bernard, J.H. and Hyršl, J. (2004)

IMA/CNMNC List of Mineral Names (2009) and Canadian Mineralogist 45 (2007), 935

Kamphaugite-(Y)

Named in honor of the supplier of the first specimens, Norwegian mineral collector Erling Kamphaug. Kamphaugite is an uncommon mineral that occurs late in low temperature contact-metamorphosed skarn and in altered, metasomatic alkali granite, as well as in quartz-barite in carbonatized volcanic deposits. Localities for Kamphaugite include in Norway, Italy, Kazakhstan, Hungary, Russia, South Africa, Canada, the United States, and Australia.

Ref. Handbook of Mineralogy, Anthony et al (1995) and MSA at http://www.handbookofmineralogy.org/pdfs/kamphaugite-(Y).pdf

Kapundaite

Named for the type locality near the town of Kapunda at Tom’s Phosphate quarry in South Australia, Australia. It occurs there as cavernous aggregates of fibers in association with leucophosphite, natrodufrenite, and meurigite-Na. Crystals of Kapundaite are pale to golden yellow thin, flattened fibers. An additional locality for Kapundaite is in France at the Puech de Leguo quarry in Midi-Pyrenees.

Ref. Mills, S. J. et al. and American Mineralogist May-June v. 95 no. 5-6 p. 754-760

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